How to Interpret the Different Region of Circuit Breaker Curves

 

Circuit Breaker
by: EATON 


Circuit breaker time-current characteristic curves are read similar to fuse curves. The horizontal axis represents the current, and the vertical axis represents the time at which the breaker interrupts the circuit. When using molded case circuit breakers of this type, there are four basic curve considerations that must be understood. 


These are:

  1. Overload Region
  2. Instantaneous Region

Overload Region

The opening of a molded case circuit breaker in the overload region is generally accomplished by a thermal element, while a magnetic coil is generally used on power breakers. Electronic sensing breakers will utilize CTs. As can be seen, the overload region has a wide tolerance band, which means the breaker should open within that area for a particular overload current.


Instantaneous Region

The instantaneous trip (I.T.) setting indicates the multiple of the full load rating at which the circuit breaker will open as quickly as possible. The instantaneous region is represented in the following curve and is shown to be adjustable from 5x to 10x the breaker rating. When the breaker coil senses an overcurrent in the instantaneous region, it releases the latch which holds the contacts closed.




Interrupting Rating

The interrupting rating of a circuit breaker is a critical factor concerning protection and safety. The interrupting rating of a circuit breaker is the maximum fault current the breaker has been tested to interrupt in accordance with testing laboratory standards. Fault currents in excess of the interrupting rating can result in the destruction of the breaker and equipment and possible injury to personnel. In other words, when the fault level exceeds the circuit breaker interrupting rating, the circuit breaker is no longer a protective device.



Illustration: Medium to High-Level Fault Currents–Circuit Breakers


The following curve illustrates a 400A circuit breaker ahead of a 90A breaker. Any fault above 1500A on the load side of the 90A breaker will open both breakers. 





The 90A breaker will generally unlatch before the 400A breaker. However, before the 90A breaker can separate its contacts and clear the fault current, the 400A breaker has unlatched and also will open. Assume a 4000A short circuit exists on the load side of the 90A circuit breaker. 


Read: What is the advantage of using Thermal Magnetic Circuit Breaker in motor control?


The sequence of events would be as follows: 

  1. The 90A breaker will unlatch (Point A) and free the breaker mechanism to start the actual opening process.
  2. The 400A breaker will unlatch (Point B) and it, too, would begin the opening process. Once a breaker unlatches, it will open. At the unlatching point, the process is irreversible. 
  3. At Point C, the 90A breaker will have completely interrupted the fault current. 
  4. At Point D, the 400A breaker also will have completely opened the circuit. Consequently, this is a non-selective system, causing a complete blackout to the other loads protected by the 400A breaker.

Reference: 

Cooper Bussman |  Download

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